Kill A Watt

Lyons Public Library is one of 54 Oregon libraries participating in the Energy Trust of Oregon's program to provide greater access to energy savings.

September 8, 2010

Kill A Watt energy monitors now available for checkout at 54 Oregon

libraries

Energy Trust of Oregon to provide nearly two million Oregonians with

greater access to energy savings

PORTLAND, Ore. — September 8, 2010 — Oregonians can now checkout a new tool at the

library that can help them check-in to energy savings at home. Energy Trust of Oregon has

joined forces with the Oregon State Library to provide Kill A Watt® energy monitors that can be

borrowed, like a book, at participating public libraries across the state.

The monitors provide an easy way to measure the energy usage of household appliances and

electronics. They can also reveal many surprising energy wasters — like a television that is

turned “off” but still draws power. Or they can help identify older appliances that may be costing

a bundle to keep around.

Using the results from the Kill A Watt, households can make adjustments that can reduce their

overall energy use and lower monthly utility bills.

“Using these energy monitors can be eye opening and is a great way to learn where household

energy costs can be trimmed,” said Marshall Johnson, residential sector manager, Energy

Trust. “We are excited that so many library patrons throughout the state will now have an

opportunity to try it out for themselves.”

The Kill A Watt is simple to use: it is plugged into an electric socket, then the electronic device

to be measured is plugged into the Kill A Watt. The monitor shows how much energy the device

is using in kilowatt hours, the same measurement used on electricity bills. Those numbers can

be calculated to show energy costs by hour, day, month or year. Monitors at the library are

packaged with directions and tips, plus advice on how to apply the information learned to start

saving energy.

“Our public libraries have always helped to provide knowledge and free resources to the

communities we serve,” said Jim Scheppke, state librarian, the Oregon State Library. “Now,

together with Energy Trust, we are able to help patrons gain better knowledge about their

energy use as well.”

A total of 54 Oregon libraries now have Kill A Watt monitors available at 110 branch locations,

including all 19 branches of the Multnomah County Library — Oregon’s largest library. Energy

Trust invited libraries within its electric service territories, which are served by Portland General

Electric and Pacific Power, to take part.

® energy monitors that can be

borrowed, like a book, at participating public libraries across the state.

The monitors provide an easy way to measure the energy usage of household appliances and

electronics. They can also reveal many surprising energy wasters — like a television that is

turned “off” but still draws power. Or they can help identify older appliances that may be costing

a bundle to keep around.

Using the results from the Kill A Watt, households can make adjustments that can reduce their

overall energy use and lower monthly utility bills.

“Using these energy monitors can be eye opening and is a great way to learn where household

energy costs can be trimmed,” said Marshall Johnson, residential sector manager, Energy

Trust. “We are excited that so many library patrons throughout the state will now have an

opportunity to try it out for themselves.”

The Kill A Watt is simple to use: it is plugged into an electric socket, then the electronic device

to be measured is plugged into the Kill A Watt. The monitor shows how much energy the device

is using in kilowatt hours, the same measurement used on electricity bills. Those numbers can

be calculated to show energy costs by hour, day, month or year. Monitors at the library are

packaged with directions and tips, plus advice on how to apply the information learned to start

saving energy.

“Our public libraries have always helped to provide knowledge and free resources to the

communities we serve,” said Jim Scheppke, state librarian, the Oregon State Library. “Now,

together with Energy Trust, we are able to help patrons gain better knowledge about their

energy use as well.”

A total of 54 Oregon libraries now have Kill A Watt monitors available at 110 branch locations,

including all 19 branches of the Multnomah County Library — Oregon’s largest library. Energy

Trust invited libraries within its electric service territories, which are served by Portland General

Electric and Pacific Power, to take part.

Libraries in all four quadrants of Oregon are represented with more still being added. The

Oregon State Library estimates that nearly two million patrons will now have access to the new

energy-saving tools.

Several libraries in Oregon established earlier Kill A Watt lending programs, which have been

well-received, including those in the Eugene, Sandy and Salem areas. And nationwide, similar

programs are gaining popularity.

A complete list of participating libraries and more information about the Kill A Watt monitors can

be found at www.energytrust.org/checkoutsavings.

Energy Trust of Oregon is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to helping utility

customers benefit from saving energy and tapping renewable resources. Our services, cash

incentives and energy solutions have helped participating customers of Portland General

Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas save nearly $600 million on

energy bills. Our work helps keep energy costs as low as possible, creates jobs and builds a

sustainable energy future. Learn more at www.energytrust.org or call 1-866-368-7878.

The Oregon State Library in Salem has been working to develop and improve library services

for all Oregonians since 1905. The State Library provides information and research to state

government agencies and serves blind and print-disabled Oregonians with talking book and

Braille library services. To learn more about the State Library go to www.oregon.gov/osl.

     This program was recently featured on Portland television news stations. View one of those presentations 

here:  http://www.kgw.com/lifestyle/New-tool-allows-you-to-check-out-energy-savings-102575809.html